The Easter Promise

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The Easter Promise

 

Three men.

Three punishments.

Three crosses.

 

One forsaken.

One forgiven.

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One forgiver.

 

His purpose.

His decision.

His promise.

 

Our stories.

Our punishment.

Our decision.

Forced change vs Needed change

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A few weeks ago I read a passage from John Maxwell in his book The Maxwell Daily Reader about scurvy. The passage summarizes difficulties in implementing the cure for the prevention of the disease during the time of European exploration of the Americas. Multiple sources knew about the effect of fresh fruit and vegetables, but due to poor communication, stubbornness, and pride of the medical establishment, the change needed to prevent the disease was delayed.

I polled a couple of my colleagues to ask them what they thought is a modern day business scurvy. One of them replied, “This is a good question. Sometimes, forced change can hide needed change, and the two become hard to distinguish for relevancy and value with so much activity happening at once.”

His answer summarizes both the challenge faced by European sailors as well as leaders in our business environment today. I thought about this for a few minutes and then wrote a quick list to try to distinguish between ‘forced change’ and ‘needed change’. I did this quickly so as to record my “gut feel” and then observed the list as a means of reflection and learning.

Forced change

  • Reporting structure reorganization
  • Technology platform adoption
  • Technology platform migration
  • Compliance
  • Outsourcing

Needed change

  • Removing waste from processes
  • Adding value to a customer relationship
  • Cross-department collaboration improvements

When I read the list a few patterns occurred to me:

  1. The items in the ‘forced change’ list concern people, tools, and rules. The items in the ‘needed change’ list are about process, value, and communication.
  2. The items in ‘needed change’ are more impactful and longer lasting to the business.  The items in ‘forced change’ can be tactical tools to help drive needed change if executed for the right reason. For example, some technology adoption is aimed to reduce the process steps in product delivery (remove waste) to the customer. Likewise, some compliance changes will help an organization tighten their processes to be more secure in how they handle data (add value to customer relationship).
  3. The challenge with the items in the ‘forced change’ list is we often implement before there is a common understanding with all the employees about why those changes are enacted. Implementation of forced change truly feels forced. When that happens, the change will either fail outright or fail to achieve the desired results.

So what is our modern day business scurvy? I would answer; it is the failure to align the reasons for needed change in an organization with the tactical implementation of change. With that thought, I see signs of scurvy in my own management and leadership approach. Ouch. It’s time to find some citrus for my business diet.

Onward and upward!

Photo credit: Pablo Vidosola via Creative Commons – https://flic.kr/p/pGWebT

 

Have your job to the full

Abundant life.

I recently read a verse in the gospel of John (10:10) about having life to the full, or an abundant life. There’s an attraction to define a fully abundant life in terms of positive and uplifting things; Hopes, dreams, successes, comforts, good health, wonder, and joy.

But when I thought about this concept a little more, it became apparent that a full life really means a complete life. A full life isn’t void of challenges, setbacks, failures, discomforts, poor health, and learning. These are natural events we all experience. If I consider the full collection of events in my life, I see a more full and abundant experience.

What about an abundant work life?

I believe the same principle applies to my career. Having my job to the full, or having an abundant work life, means there will be days when I love my job and days when I am uncomfortable with it. There will be times of accomplishment, reward, and achievement. There will also be times of failure and setback.

A complete work-life includes deeper experiences such as servanthood, humility, courage, disappointment, and frustration. My acceptance of the spectrum of experiences determines just how much I accept the concept of having a job to the full. I love the work I do; All of it.

Onward and upward!